EYE DISEASES  
UVEITIS (NEW)
 

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Uveitis

Uveitis is inflammation of the uvea, the middle layer of the eye. Uvea consists of the iris, ciliary body and the choroid. Uveitis can occur in any parts of these structures solely or in combination.

Inflammation of the front of the eye or iris is called anterior uveitis.  Inflammation of the ciliary body is called intermediate uveitis . Inflammation of the choroid is called choroiditis. When all three parts are involved, it is called panuveitis.

Causes

There are several, including:

 

 

Symptoms

Uveitis can affect one or both eyes. Symptoms may develop rapidly and can include:

Treatment

A complete medical history, eye examination and retinal imaging (Optical Coherence Tomography) should be performed. Laboratory tests may be done to rule out infection or an autoimmune disorder. Treatment of uveitis depends on the underlying disease, the treatment is focused on reducing inflammation and relieving pain. If you have an infection, your doctor will prescribe antibiotics.

For noninfectious uveitis, treatment will usually include prescription eye drops or ointments containing corticosteroids to reduce inflammation.

If uveitis affects the iris, eye drops that dilate the pupil also may be prescribed so that the iris won't move and cause pain. Your doctor may recommend sunglasses because bright light may cause discomfort.

For more severe cases oral forms of corticosteroids or additional immunosuppressive medications are needed. Examples of immunosuppressive therapies used in the treatment of uveitis include methotrexate and azathioprine.

In rare cases, surgery may be needed to treat uveitis. However, this is usually only recommended if you have repeated or severe uveitis, or if the condition is caused by a fungal infection.

An operation called a vitrectomy can be used to treat uveitis. This involves gently sucking out the jelly-like substance that fills the inside of the eye (the vitreous humour). It can be carried out either using general anaesthetic or local anaesthetic. At the end of the surgery, silicone oil or a gas is injected into the eye to replace the vitreous gel and restore normal pressure in the eye.