EYE DISEASES  
SUBCONJUNCTIVAL HEMMORHAGE
 

Cataract
Cataract FAQ
Amblyopia
AMD
Astigmatism
Chalazion
Diabetic Retinopathy
Dry Eyes
Floaters
Glaucoma
Hyperopia
Myopia
Presbyopia
Pterygium
Retinal Detachment
Subconjunctival Hemmorage
Uveitis

Subconjunctival hemorrhage occurs when a small blood vessel breaks open and bleeds near the surface of the white of the eye. It may happen without injury, and is often first noticed when you wake up and look in a mirror. Usually benign, it causes no vision problems or significant eye discomfort despite its conspicuous appearance.

Causes

Though not always possible to identify the source of the problem, some causes are:

  • Sudden increase in eye pressure due to heavy lifting, coughing, sneezing, laughing and constipation
  • High blood pressure or blood thinners
  • Straining or vomiting
  • Vigorous eye rubbing
  • Trauma (injury) to the head or eye
  • Bleeding disorder, or medical disorder causing bleeding or inhibiting normal clotting
  • Severe eye infection
  • Eye or eyelid surgery
 

 

Symptoms

Bright red patch appears in the white part (bulbar conjunctiva) of the eye


Treatment

Make sure not to rub your eye, which can increase the risk of re-bleeding right after onset. There is generally no specific treatment for subconjunctival hemorrhage. It usually goes away on its own in a few weeks’ time. Lubricants or artificial tears can soothe the eyes, although they cannot help repair broken blood vessels. Those taking a blood thinner should continue to do so unless instructed otherwise by your doctor.