EYE DISEASES  
HYPEROPIA
 

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Farsightedness, or hyperopia, is a refractive error in which distant objects are usually seen clearly, but close ones appears blurred or do not come into proper focus. It occurs if the eyeball is too short or the cornea has too little curvature, so light entering your eye is not focused correctly.

Causes

Like myopia or nearsightedness, farsightedness is usually inherited. Though hyperopia is often present at birth some outgrow it as the eyeball lengthens with normal growth. Since children’s eyes can adjust to increase the eye's focusing ability, blurred vision from hyperopia often becomes apparent only from 40 years onwards.

Symptoms:

  • Difficulty in concentrating and maintaining a clear focus on near objects
  • Eye strain, fatigue and/or headaches after close work
  • Aching or burning eyes, irritability or nervousness after sustained concentration

If you experience these symptoms while wearing your own glasses or contact lenses, it is time to have a comprehensive eye examination as well as a new prescription.


Treatment

There is no best method to correct farsightedness. The type of correction for you depends on your eyes and your lifestyle. Discuss with your ophthalmologist or optometrist to decide which correction is most effective for you.

  • Glasses or contact lenses: These are most common. They work by refocusing light rays on the retina, compensating for the shape of your eye. Depending on the severity of your vision problem, you may need to wear your glasses or contacts all the time or only when reading, working on a computer or doing other close-up work.

  • LASIK or another similar form of refractive surgery: These surgical procedures correct or improve vision by reshaping the cornea (the front surface of your eye) effectively to adjust your eye’s focusing ability. Refractive surgeries require healthy eyes that are free from retinal problems, corneal scars and any eye disease.


As technology progresses, it is becoming more and more important that all options and possibilities are explored and understood before deciding which refractive surgery and treatment is right for you.