EYE DISEASES  
DRY EYES
 

Cataract
Cataract FAQ
Amblyopia
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Pterygium
Retinal Detachment
Subconjunctival Hemmorage
Uveitis

The eye depends on a flow of tears to provide constant moisture and lubrication to maintain vision and comfort. A sufficient quality of tears, a normal composition of the tear film, normal lid closure and regular blinking are essential to maintain a healthy ocular surface.

Excess tears
In a patient with dry eyes this may seem confusing. The eye sends a distress signal through the nervous system, causing eyes to tear, to compensate for the dryness. These tears are mostly water and do not have the lubricating qualities or the rich composition of normal tears

Causes

  • Imbalance in the eye’s tear-flow system
  • Dry air from air conditioning, heat, or other environmental conditions
  • The natural aging process, especially menopause
  • Structural eye lid problems that don't allow them to close properly
  • Side effects of certain medications such as antihistamines and birth control pills
  • Long-term contact lens wear
  • Diseases that affect the ability to make tears, such as Sjogren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, and collagen vascular diseases

Treatment
Dry eye may not be completely curable. But the accompanying dryness, scratchiness and burning can be managed by:

  • Artificial tear drops and ointments: This includes Restasis, a prescription eye drop that helps increase tear production with continued use.
  • Temporary / permanent punctal plugs: These plug the ducts that drain tears out of the eye. A temporary plug which dissolves over a few days may be used. If it works well, it can be replaced by silicone plugs (punctal occlusion). Often the plugs improve comfort and reduce the need for artificial tears.
  • Surgery: If needed, a minor procedure can be done to close the ducts that drain the tears. This allows more tears to remain around the eye.