EYE DISEASES  
CHALAZION
 

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Chalazion
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Uveitis

A chalazion (also known as a meibomian cyst, tarsal cyst, or conjunctival granuloma) is a lump on the lid, caused by a blocked oil gland in the upper or lower eyelid. It is filled with pus and blocked fatty secretions that normally help lubricate the eye, but now can’t drain out.

Causes

Those with frequent lid problems, such as blepharitis are more prone than most, to getting them. The narrow opening through which the gland secretes oil becomes clogged when it narrows or the sebaceous liquid near it hardens.
If this occurs, the gland gets blocked and swells. This leads to thickening of its walls and leakage of oil into the lid itself, causing inflammation both within the gland and the eyelid.


This swelling can exert pressure on the cornea and induce astigmatism as the curvature alters.  The sufferer may have blurry vision either intermittently or regularly.

Treatment

Most chalazions go away by themselves. Like most lid-related problems, chalazia are treated with warm compresses to promote healing and circulation of blood to the inflamed area. An antibiotic drop or ointment may be prescribed to be used after the compresses. If the chalazion persists it can be removed surgically through the inside of the lid.
A chalazion that recurs in the same spot on the lid is cause for concern and it is standard practice to send the tissue for analysis for potential malignancy.